Blog Revision

Original: He does this primarily through the analysis and description of the trail-running of Scott Jurek. In the conclusion of the article, Scott Jurek states “Your body can accomplish a lot, but at the end of the day—like those days where I’d be running for hours on the AT—sometimes you just start stumbling and giving in.” This quote, along with Schraminski’s vivid description of the capabilities of the brain, highlight a very apparent gap between what we limit our body to with our consciousness and what our body is capable of.

Revised: While Schraminski composes in detail, Jurek uses simplistic and even rudimentary terms of how he accomplishes trail running. When asked how he accomplishes these great feats, he simply responds, “Well, you just do it.” Here, Jurek demonstrates how our body and brain may be on an incredibly high level, but what we perceive is still simple. Additionally, in the conclusion of the article, Scott Jurek insightfully proclaims, “Your body can accomplish a lot, but at the end of the day—like those days where I’d be running for hours on the AT—sometimes you just start stumbling and giving in.” This quote, along with Schraminski’s vivid description of the capabilities of the brain, highlight a very apparent gap between what we limit our body to with our consciousness and what our body is capable of. Because of the contrast between Schraminski’s explanation of how complex our brain and body our, and their ability to perform such intricate tasks, and Jurek’s simple, but accurate descriptions of his trail running ability, the article is able portray the shackles we put on our brain and body’s ability by giving into pain, fatigue, and adversity.